Bronchodilators

Definition
Drugs that dilate the bronchi and bronchioles
Increase the airflow through them
Decrease the resistance in the respiratory airway
Most useful in obstructice lung diseses like bronchial asthma and COPD

Short acting β2 agonists
For quick relief of bronchospasm
Take effect within 20 minutes
Last for 4 to 6 hourss
Inhaled medicines
Can be taken to prevent asthma symptoms
taken 15 to 20 minutes before exercise or exposure to cold

Salbutamol

Long acting β2 agonists (Adrenergic Bronchodilators)
Long term medications taken routinely
Not for fast relief
Act for 12 hours
Taken with anti-inflammatory medication

Salmeterol and Formoterol

Anticholinergics
These are long acting anticholinergic bronchodilators used in COPD
Only available as inhalant
It will relieve acute or new asthma symptoms
It will not stop  an asthma attack already in progress.
It does not have any effect on asthma symptoms when used alone it is combined with a short acting β2 agonists.
Ipratropium bromide
Tiotropium bromide

Others  (Methylxanthines)
Theophylline - long acting
It is a methyl xanthine
Helps in severe cases of asthma
To be taken 1-4 times a day
Side effects : nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach ache, head ache, tremors, rapid or irregular hear beats, GERD

Common bronchodilators
Salbutamol
Levosalbutamol
Epinephrine
Terbutaline
Alupent (metaproterenol)
Isuprel (isoproterenol)
Salmeterol
Salmeterol
Formoterol
Bambuterol
Indacaterol
Adrenaline (epinephrin)
Ipratropium
Tiotropium
Theophylline









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